The Wheel of Segais

The Wheel of Natural Change

Introduction

“Nature is the source of all true knowledge. She has her own logic, her own laws, she has no effect without cause nor invention without necessity.” – Leonardo da Vinci

I am a Life Coach and a workshop facilitator, I run Change Management and Career Management workshops for businesses and business people and I was for over 30 years a television Producer and Director of documentary and drama. I am also a Druid with the international Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids and a Celebrant. You would think that each of these would require very different skills and demands but, walking the forest path of druidry, I have found a way, no matter where or with whom I’m working, to create simplicity out of chaos. I have come to the conclusion that all we need to know in life we can learn from a tree and I have created a ‘wisdom cycle’ I call The Wheel of Segais – a system for living treefully.

Living Treefully

Today Druids are not the only ones spending time with trees and in forests and for many ‘Living Treefully’ is no longer just a metaphor.

Shinrin-yoku (forest bathing) has been practised by businesses and individuals in Japan since the 1980s and has become a cornerstone of preventive health care and healing in Japanese medicine. Researchers primarily in Japan and South Korea have established a robust body of scientific literature on the health benefits of spending time under the canopy of a living forest. The idea is simple: if a person simply visits a natural area and walks in a relaxed way there are calming, rejuvenating and restorative benefits to be achieved including deeper and clearer intuition, improved relationship skills and reduced stress.

Forest therapy approaches such as Shinrin-yoku have roots in many cultures throughout history.

“Our truest nature to fully connect, heal and grow is to be mirrored by something that reflects our full essence. I believe the natural world is that ideal mirror” – Regina M Powers

Change

‘I know things must change but it’s just too hard”. This is the phrase I hear most often. We are wary of change, we don’t like it and we will resist it vehemently even when we know it is inevitable and maybe even a good thing. I hear it in organisations and in relationships. I hear it when a career change or improvement is required or when a project or great idea can’t get off the ground. And yet natural change is going on around us all the time – the sun comes up the sun goes down; the moon goes from dark to full to dark again; we sleep, we wake, and while we might rail against changes in the weather, we greet each season as it arrives as a natural part of life. So might the response of Nature to the natural cycle of the seasons have something to teach us about managing change easily and elegantly? About ‘living treefully?

If we can stop rushing, take a walk in the forest (actually or reflectively) and listen to the trees, we absorb a wisdom that everything works in an order which I call seasonal because the trees, the plants, the flowers, the vegetables, all dance to the seasons. They don’t say, ‘Oh, okay today I don’t feel much like being a peach so today I think I’ll go back to being a blossom.” Or “Maybe I’ll be a rock or a log and just sit around.” Or, “ I can’t be bothered doing anything today”. Nature doesn’t do any of that but just gets on with it and responds to different processes at different times of the year.

“Nature never breaks her own laws” – Leonardo da Vinci

And that’s what helped me come to a simple understanding, that the wisdom of the trees is not only the wisdom of how we could live our lives but is the actual natural cycle of our lives. And not just a life but all the lives within our lives – business, relationships, education, career, children, projects, friends and passions. All of my change management, career management and life coaching is now based on this simple but profound understanding.

“You are a function of what the whole universe is doing in the same way that a wave is a function of what the whole ocean is doing.” Alan Watts